When Should You Take Your Wisdom Teeth Out

October 15, 2018  |  by James Sampson  |  News
When Should You Take Your Wisdom Teeth Out

Wisdom teeth usually come in during your late teens to early twenties. Besides pain, when should you take your wisdom teeth out?

Signs You Need Your Wisdom Teeth Taken Out:

Not every patient experiences pain associated with their wisdom teeth. Sometimes a dentist will recommend pulling them based on your x-rays if the wisdom teeth will cause overcrowding or put excess pressure on the other teeth as they move.

How to know when to get your wisdom teeth pulled?

When overcrowding occurs, teeth that were once straight begin to shift. Shifted teeth can cause problems such as one tooth moving in front of another, gum issues, and even result in infections caused by trapped food.

  1. Pain is usually the first sign that your wisdom teeth are causing problems and will need to be pulled (extracted).
  2. Hot/cold sensitivity can be another indicator.
  3. Impacted teeth is another common issue from wisdom teeth coming in crooked. When there isn’t enough room in the mouth the teeth will commonly grow in on an angle and sometimes not in the same direction as the rest of your teeth. This usually results in tenderness, swelling, gum infections, and damage to surrounding teeth. When wisdom teeth are impacted, it is highly recommended to remove them as soon as possible. Impacted teeth are more likely to cause jaw issues and can cause other serious problems.

What Can I Expect With Wisdom Teeth Removal Surgery?

Wisdom tooth removal is a pretty common routine procedure at this point. If the teeth are impacted or require any cutting into the gums then an oral surgeon will usually perform the procedure.

After removal, the dentist will use surgical dental sutures to close the wound to allow for proper healing. You will also be given something to assist with pain and swelling, a mouth rinse, as well as special post-care instructions to help keep the wound clean and avoid infection.

Does Recovering From Surgery Take Long?

healing from any tooth removal can take some time. A diet consisting of soft foods or even liquids will be required for a couple days to avoid chewing on the area and to help with pain. You will need to ice the area for the first 48 hours or as needed for pain.

Smoking’s Impact on Your Oral Health

August 21, 2018  |  by James Sampson  |  News
Smoking’s Impact on Your Oral Health

By now, you’re likely aware of smoking’s impact on your oral health. However, you might not realize the serious effects smoking has on your overall dental care. Since your mouth is the starting point for all cigarette damage, you’ll deal with significant oral health issues when smoking.

Since the nicotine found in cigarettes immediately hit your teeth as you are smoking, this is the worst side effect. These chemicals can lead to yellow stains on your teeth that are difficult to remove. Smoking also weakens the protective enamel on your teeth.  This can leave your teeth more susceptible to bacteria that cause tooth rot and weakened enamel. Overall, leading your teeth to become more sensitive.

Additionally, this build up of bacteria can lead to gum disease, which causes your gums to recede and compromises the stability of your teeth. Finally, perhaps the most major impact smoking has on your oral health is oral cancer.

Regular Dental Visits Are Important for Smokers

You’ll find a variety of mouthwashes and toothpastes marketed to smokers with claims that they can help repair damage caused by smoking. This includes toothpastes made to remove yellow nicotine stains and products used to mask cigarette odour in your mouth.

However, no product on the market is as effective at treating oral problems brought on by smoking as actually quitting smoking. Additionally, many of these products use abrasive and harsh chemicals to attack bacteria that thrive in a smoker’s mouth. Yet these products can do nothing to restore enamel, prevent gum and tooth rot, or stop any type of oral cancer.

If you’re a smoker, it’s important you regularly visit your dentist to monitor your oral health, and visit your local Hoover Alabama dentist Sampson Dentistry.

Does Cold Temperatures Make My Teeth Hurt?

March 19, 2018  |  by James Sampson  |  News
Does Cold Temperatures Make My Teeth Hurt?

Does Cold Temperatures Make My Teeth Hurt? Yes, cold temperatures can make your teeth hurt. In response to extreme heat and cold, your teeth expand and contract. Over time, this can lead to cracks in your teeth, exposing the vulnerable microscopic tubes beneath your enamel. This is the same tooth pain you feel because of cavities, gum disease, and other bad oral habits. Therefore, any problems with your enamel or gums, such as periodontal disease, could leave you vulnerable to cold temperature pain.

Weather sensitivity can occur regardless of how well you care for your teeth, but you’re at greater risk if you don’t practice good oral hygiene and live in an area that has extreme temperature swings.

To minimize sensitivity, you should learn about the common causes for sensitive teeth and what you should do when you notice pain because of the cold temperature.

Individuals often wear down their enamel or suffer from receding gums and tooth sensitivity because of one of the following reasons:

  • Periodontal disease: Diseases of the gums can expose the dentin and cause sensitivity. Gingivitis is one of the earliest stages of periodontal disease.
  • Brushing too hard: You may think that you need to bear down hard to remove surface stains, but brushing with too much force can start to wear down your enamel.
  • Grinding: Some individuals may clench or grind their teeth in their sleep. This can wear down tooth enamel and lead to sensitivity.
  • Tooth decay: Sensitivity to cold is an early sign of an undetected tooth decay problem. If you start to experience tooth pain, go see a dentist.
  • Tooth whitening applications: Have you started using a new tooth-whitening agent? The ingredients that make your teeth whiter may strip past surface stains and start wearing down your enamel. If the agent starts hurting your teeth, stop the treatment and consult with your dentist.
  • Acidic drinks: Sodas, coffee, tea, and other drinks with a high concentration of acid, such as juices, can erode your teeth and expose the dentin layer.
  • bad lifestyle habits: Other bad oral health habits, such as using tobacco products or not brushing or flossing properly, can cause your gums to recede. When this happens, the dentin at the base of the gums is exposed and can lead to temperature-sensitive teeth.

Possible Solutions for Sensitive Teeth

  • A fluoride application: Fluoride strengthens the enamel and thus prevents sensitivity because of exposed dentin.
  • Covering root surfaces: A dentist can apply a sealant to fix problems with receding gums.
  • Mouth guards: If you grind your teeth, a dentist can make a mouth guard to prevent you from damaging your teeth in your sleep.
  • Root canal procedure: This is recommended to fix issues with deep decay or a cracked or chipped tooth.