What Happens if You Don’t Repair a Chipped Tooth?

February 6, 2019  |  by James Sampson  |  News
What Happens if You Don’t Repair a Chipped Tooth?

So, what happens if you don’t repair a chipped tooth? A little chip on a tooth may not seem like a big deal, especially if it is a molar that no one can see. Smaller chips are usually not problematic unless they are sharp, then they could possibly cut your mouth. However, if your chipped tooth is significant enough, it could lead to more serious problems such as pain, hot/cold sensitivity, bad breath, swollen glands, and even infected roots.

  1. Sharp edges can cut your cheek, tongue, and gums
  2. Deep chips can impact the root of the tooth, leading to potential infections or tooth aches
  3. Deep chips can cause tooth decay resulting in sensitivity and bad breath
  4. Chips of all sizes can grow bigger and cause larger issues resulting in the need for root canals or extractions

When do you need to repair a Chipped tooth?

You should always visit the dentist when you chip a tooth. For minor chips, you typically won’t need a major repair. More often than not, your dentist in Hoover Alabama can just file the chipped tooth or fill it with a dermal bond so it looks normal again. However, more significant cracks can require more extensive dental work.

If a chip is significant enough, it can damage the pulp that is inside the tooth. The dental pulp is the center of your tooth, made up of living tissue, blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue.

Damage to the pulp can be extremely painful and, if untreated, can become infected. If this happens, you could be in for more extensive dental work.

Call the staff at Sampson Dentistry in Hoover Alabama to have your crack tooth fixed.

Myths About Flossing

November 26, 2018  |  by James Sampson  |  News
Myths About Flossing

Myth: I Only Need to Floss When I Have Food Caught in My Teeth

We have included some myths about flossing. While flossing is an effective way to remove trapped food particles from between your teeth, this isn’t the only reason to floss. Floss also removes dental plaque from between your teeth. If this plaque is left to sit between your teeth, it can make your gums inflamed and lead to tooth decay, gum disease, and even tooth loss. Floss every day, not just when food gets stuck.

Myth: I Should Stop Flossing if My Gums Bleed

Seeing blood when you floss can be a little scary, but some bleeding is totally normal. It’s definitely not a reason to give up flossing!

Bleeding during flossing can alert you to some potential problems though. Some people bleed because they’re flossing too enthusiastically. If you bleed a lot, be gentler and see whether you bleed less. You may like to get some pointers about flossing techniques from your dentist or dental hygienist. People with gum disease usually bleed more than others when they floss. Take a close look at your gum line and see whether it’s inflamed. If you think you might have gum disease, schedule an appointment with your dentist.

Myth: Flossing Makes Receding Gums Worse

There’s no truth to the myth that flossing correctly exacerbates receding gums. In fact, flossing can actually prevent gums from receding, since it cleans food particles and bacteria out from below the gum line. That makes flossing crucial for people with hereditary receding gums and gingivitis. If your gums are already receding due to periodontitis, flossing daily can help prevent further damage.

Overzealous flossing can speed up gum recession though. See your dentist or dental hygienist for advice on the best flossing technique.

Myth: I Can’t Floss Because My Teeth Are Very Tight

Flossing teeth that have little space between them can be challenging, but that doesn’t give you an excuse to skip this important oral ritual. You might need to adjust your technique. Use a seesaw motion, moving the floss backward and forward to manoeuvre it between the tight spaces between your teeth.

Certain flosses are also easier to use when your teeth are right. Try waxed floss or floss made from a substance called polytetrafluoroethylene if you struggle to use regular floss on your tight teeth. These flosses have slippery surfaces that can slide between tight spaces more easily. Some dental flosses are also thinner than others, and thus better for people with teeth close together.

Myth: I Shouldn’t Floss Because I Have Braces

Braces can certainly make flossing challenging. But failing to floss for the months or years that you have braces is a bad idea. Just imagine how much food and bacteria will be stuck between your teeth by the time you get your braces off! There’s no point straightening your teeth if they’re not healthy when your braces are removed. If you find flossing with braces difficult, your dentist, dental hygienist, or orthodontist can help you perfect your technique.